Holiday Traditions

A few years back I invited a friend on a nighttime walk with me and Geordie to view the Christmas lights around the neighborhood. Since then the Christmas lights dog walk has grown to a fairly sizable group of us who meet by the community pool and stop here and there for libations. I haven’t had a chance to make a movie of this year’s fun, hopefully that will be coming soon. But have no fear! Here are a couple of movies to keep you entertained:

Ice skating in downtown Tucson. Yup.

May your holiday season be filled with warmth and wonder!


How about you? What do you like to do for the holidays?

13 thoughts on “Holiday Traditions

    • Actually, temperature-wise, it’s really not the right place for ice-skating, and this winter has been unusually warm. In fact, they had to reschedule the opening day for the rink because it reached a high temp in the 80’s, and they couldn’t stop the ice from melting away. Things are changing now, getting colder, finally. (I want to wear the cold weather crocheted stuff I’ve been making.) Today’s high is supposed to be 58 degrees, which is more like what we’re used to for winter. I’m hoping to see some snow on the mountain. It would be nice if it snowed in the valley, but I doubt it will.

      By the way, I have a question for you. In Germany is stollen (or marzipan stollen) a thing you normally see cropping up in bakeries around Christmastime? Or is it around all the time, or only in winter? Just curious.

      Anyway, I hope you’ve had a Merry Christmas and I wish you a happy new year!

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      • 58 would be warm here for winter, but such temperatures are becoming more common for winter. Over the last days it was frosty here but now temperatures are back above the freezing point and for Thursday, 53 is predicted.
        Stollen is a typical Christmas time thing. It is traditionally a thing from Saxony. My father’s parents used to live in Saxony (then GDR). My parents used to send them coffee and chocolate, things hard to get there in good quality. In return, we always received a big Stollen. I remember it as very delicious.
        In the old times people used to make it themselves, at least partially. I have a letter from my grandmother from the 1950s where she describes that she made the dough and then brought it to the backery, where they would bake it. Baking as a service. But during my childhood days in the late 1960s, the Stollen we received was one my grandfather had bought.
        Maybe one can now buy it at other times of the year, but I have not paid attention to that. Christmas is now very commercialized and my impression is that the companies producing christmas specialties are trying to bring them to the market one week earlier every year. And almost as soon as Christmas things are out of the shops, the Easter stuff starts appearing.

        I wish you a happy new year!

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        • I love it that your grandmother was able to take her dough to the bakery and get them to bake it in their ovens. Sounds like something I would do if I could. It’s quite a challenge to replicate a good bread oven, especially since home ovens aren’t equipped with steamers and vents (none that I know of anyway). And for things like pizza crust, you want to get those temperatures soaring, which isn’t possible with most home ovens. I’ve had to come up with few hacks to deal with not having a proper bakery oven.

          I’ve been making my own stollen for the holidays the past couple years, and while I like the recipe I’ve been using, I have no idea if what I’m making tastes the way stollen is “supposed” to taste because I’ve never had anything but what I’ve baked myself. The stollen you had, do you remember if it was nearly half fruit and nuts and marzipan? Was it more bread-y than sweet, or more sweet than bread-y? The one I make is really something between a dessert and a bread. It seems like the kind of thing to have for breakfast.

          I know what you mean about pushing Christmas earlier and earlier. It used to be a rule that the lights didn’t go up until after Thanksgiving, but this year I was seeing them go up right after Halloween in some cases. Apparently some stores were selling out of Christmas stuff even before December.

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